Public Service Announcement for Cable TV Premieres!

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The Hillsborough Animal Health Foundation is pleased to announce the World Premiere of “Genna and Buddy,” two friendly animated pets who have some news for the pet lovers of Hillsborough County!  Genna, the in-charge know it all cat, and Buddy, the laid-back dog, will be delivering educational segments on cable TV channels throughout the year.  The first educational segment, focusing on the importance of getting real exams from a veterinarian at least once a year, commences airing the week of March 19, and will be running for the next six weeks on BrightHouse and Verizon cable channels.  To see the first segment, visit www.hahf.org.

Recent news has demonstrated the importance of having a relationship with a local veterinarian.  Unfortunate news from North Florida shows that the owners of “Pet Care A Van,” a drug store vaccine clinic provider, were recently arrested and charged with fraud and other criminal violations.  It was discovered that this company was operating illegally in South Carolina, and after being banned from South Carolina, moved to begin new illegal operations in Florida. 

Sadly, that is all too easy, as these operators move from location to location without establishing any local roots.  Veterinary hospitals, conversely, are highly regulated and inspected on a regular basis, as well as being required to have licensing and other permitting prominently displayed.  Further, hospitals in Florida are required to have a veterinarian on site at all times, along with the equipment and staff necessary to take care of any emergencies.  Most importantly, veterinarians in local hospitals take the needed time to thoroughly examine every pet before vaccinating.   By conducting an exam, which is legally required in order to give a rabies injection, a veterinarian is able to determine the overall health of the pet and its fitness for shots.  It is very important to understand:  not every pet should receive all available vaccines!  Pets should be individually evaluated for appropriate immunizations based on the current health, age, and environmental concerns of that particular pet.  A good exam should take at least 10 minutes, and must include a “teeth to tail” evaluation.  Anything less puts your pet’s health in jeopardy.  Make sure to have your pet thoroughly examined before vaccinating.  Your furry buddy will be grateful!

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